About The Song

Leaving On A Jet Plane, a song that has transcended generations and become a cornerstone of folk-pop music. While it’s often associated with the soaring vocals of Peter, Paul and Mary, the original penmanship and composition belong to the legendary singer-songwriter, John Denver.

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Denver’s journey with this now-iconic tune began in 1966. Back then, it was a humble Christmas present, a demo titled “Babe, I Hate to Go”, a simple ballad gifted to loved ones. The song’s potential, however, didn’t escape the keen ears of Denver’s producer, Milt Okun. Okun, recognizing the song’s inherent beauty and universal themes, urged Denver to rework it, suggesting a more evocative title – “Leaving On A Jet Plane”.

The rest, as they say, is musical history. Released in 1969, Leaving On A Jet Plane captured the bittersweet emotions of farewell. Denver’s heartfelt vocals, accompanied by his gentle acoustic guitar, painted a vivid picture – a lover on the cusp of departure, the pang of separation tinged with the hope of reunion.

The lyrics, beautifully simple yet emotionally resonant, resonated with a generation on the move. Lines like “All my bags are packed I’m ready to go” and “They don’t mean a thing, every place I go I’ll think of you” became an anthem for those embarking on journeys, be it for work, studies, or simply the pursuit of adventure.

Interestingly, despite its enduring popularity, Denver’s original version of Leaving On A Jet Plane failed to make a significant dent on the charts. The song’s true claim to fame came courtesy of the folk trio Peter, Paul and Mary.

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Their rendition, released in the same year, became a runaway hit, topping the Billboard Hot 100 chart for weeks. While Denver never quite replicated the commercial success of their version, Leaving On A Jet Plane remained a staple in his own live performances, a testament to the song’s enduring significance in his repertoire.

The song’s influence extends far beyond the realm of popular music. Leaving On A Jet Plane has been covered by a diverse range of artists, from Frank Sinatra to Dolly Parton, each adding their own unique interpretation to the timeless melody. Its presence in popular culture is undeniable, soundtracking countless movies and television shows, forever solidifying its place in the collective musical consciousness.

So, the next time you hear the melancholic strains of Leaving On A Jet Plane, remember the story behind it. It’s a testament to the power of simple songwriting, capturing the complexities of human emotions with a gentle touch. It’s a song of goodbyes, of promises whispered, and a love that transcends distance.

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Lyrics

All my bags are packed
I’m ready to go
I’m standin’ here outside your door
I hate to wake you up to say goodbye
But the dawn is breakin’
It’s early morn
The taxi’s waitin’
He’s blowin’ his horn
Already I’m so lonesome
I could die

So kiss me and smile for me
Tell me that you’ll wait for me
Hold me like you’ll never let me go
‘Cause I’m leavin’ on a jet plane
Don’t know when I’ll be back again
Oh babe, I hate to go

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There’s so many times I’ve let you down
So many times I’ve played around
I tell you now, they don’t mean a thing
Every place I go, I’ll think of you
Every song I sing, I’ll sing for you
When I come back, I’ll bring your wedding ring

So kiss me and smile for me
Tell me that you’ll wait for me
Hold me like you’ll never let me go
‘Cause I’m leavin’ on a jet plane
Don’t know when I’ll be back again
Oh babe, I hate to go

Now the time has come to leave you
One more time
Let me kiss you
Then close your eyes
And I’ll be on my way
Dream about the days to come
When I won’t have to leave alone
About the times, I won’t have to say

Kiss me and smile for me
Tell me that you’ll wait for me
Hold me like you’ll never let me go
‘Cause I’m leavin’ on a jet plane
Don’t know when I’ll be back again
Oh babe, I hate to go

But, I’m leavin’ on a jet plane
Don’t know when I’ll be back again
Oh babe, I hate to go