About the song

John Denver’s Take Me to Tomorrow. Now that’s a song that brings back a wave of nostalgia, a gentle current carrying us back to the folk revival of the late 1960s and early 1970s. Denver, with his wholesome persona, earnest vocals, and knack for crafting relatable lyrics, was a leading figure in that movement.

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Take Me to Tomorrow wasn’t Denver’s breakout hit, but it holds a significant place in his discography. Released in May 1970 as part of his second studio album of the same name, it arrived amidst a period of great social and political upheaval in the United States. The Vietnam War raged on, the Civil Rights Movement continued its fight for equality, and a general sense of disillusionment simmered beneath the surface of American life.

Take Me to Tomorrow wasn’t a protest song in the traditional sense, but it captured a yearning for something better, a desire to escape the troubles of the present and find hope in the future. The opening lines, “Hey everybody, tell me how do you feel? Are you satisfied with your life? Do you think it’s real?” immediately establish a sense of introspective questioning. Denver invites the listener on a journey, a search for meaning and purpose that transcends the harsh realities of the moment.

The melody itself is a beautiful blend of folk and pop sensibilities. Denver’s acoustic guitar weaves a simple yet evocative backdrop, while his vocals oscillate between a gentle questioning and a determined optimism. The lyrics, though seemingly straightforward, possess a deeper layer. Lines like “Would you like to find a way out, do you think it’s worth a try?” resonate with anyone who has ever felt trapped in a rut, longing for a fresh start.

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Take Me to Tomorrow wasn’t a chart-topping success, but it became a staple of Denver’s live performances. Its enduring appeal lies in its ability to tap into a universal human desire – the hope for a brighter tomorrow. It’s a song that acknowledges the challenges of the present but ultimately refuses to be bogged down by them. It’s a gentle nudge towards optimism, a reminder that even in the darkest of times, there’s always a sunrise waiting on the horizon.

Some music historians consider Take Me to Tomorrow, along with Denver’s debut album Rhymes & Reasons, to represent a more introspective and “cerebral” side of the artist compared to his later, more nature-centric work. This “second half of the show” quality, as some describe it [refer to liner notes, as mentioned in Wikipedia entry on Take Me to Tomorrow], adds another layer to the song’s significance. It showcases Denver’s artistic depth and his ability to connect with his audience on a deeper level.

So, the next time you hear the opening chords of Take Me to Tomorrow, take a moment to appreciate its place in American folk music history. It’s a song that reflects a specific time period, but its message of hope and resilience transcends generations.

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Lyrics

Hey everybody, tell me how do you feel? Are you satisfied with your life, do you think it’s real?
Tell me how is your head, what are your dreams?
Do you have any plans, do you have any schemes?

Do you care about, about anybody? I’d like to know, is the answer “no”?Take me to tomorrow, take me there today, I’ve had my fill of sorrow and living this way.
Take me to tomorrow, that’s where I’d like to be, the day after tomorrow is waiting for me.Hey everybody, what’s on your mind?
Do you think there’s nowhere else to go, there’s nothing left to find?

Read more:  John Denver - Rhymes and Reasons

Are you happy where you are, do you have anything to share?
Do you think you’re gonna waste your life spending it there?
Would you like to find a way out, do you think it’s worth a try?
I’d like to know, is the answer “no”? Well maybe so, come on,

Take me to tomorrow, take me there today, I’ve had my fill of sorrow and living this way.
Take me to tomorrow, that’s where I’d like to be, the day after tomorrow is waiting for me.
Take me to tomorrow, take me there today, I’ve had my fill of sorrow and living this way.
Take me to tomorrow, that’s where I’d like to be, the day after tomorrow is waiting,
the day after tomorrow is waiting, the day after tomorrow is waiting for me.